Teacher Killed In West Hartford Accident

(West Hartford, Conn./CBS Connecticut) - West Hartford police say a teacher at Kingswood-Oxford School was killed in a crash this morning at the intersection of Mountain Road and Boulevard involving a passenger vehicle and a school bus.

It was shortly after seven a.m. when officers say a car driven by 64-year-old Patricia Rosoff collided with a school bus en route to Conard High School.

Rosoff had to be extricated from the vehicle.

She was transported to the UConn Health Center where she was pronounced dead.

The 18 students and bus driver were not injured.

The accident remains under investigation.

West Hartford police urge anyone with any information or who may have witnessed the crash to call them at 860-523-5203.

Kingswood Oxford Dean Dies After Car Struck By School Bus

WEST HARTFORD — Patricia Rosoff, the academic dean of humanities and a beloved art and English teacher at Kingswood Oxford School, died Tuesday morning when her car was struck by a school bus.

Rosoff, 64, who had taught at KO for 39 years, was driving east on Boulevard about 7:10 a.m. when the school bus, which was traveling southbound on Mountain Road, hit her 2000 Saab broadside on the driver’s side.

West Hartford firefighters had to cut Rosoff from the car. She was then taken to the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, where she was pronounced dead.

Police are still investigating the crash and asking for witnesses to call them at 860-523-5203.

Eighteen Conard High School students and the driver, Emmanuel Cruz, 23, of Manchester, were aboard the bus. None were injured.

Rosoff began her career at KO in 1975 and was known by legions of alumni for teaching the advanced placement art history course, said Michelle M. Murphy, a spokeswoman for KO.

“She was a giant in our community, and her loss is incalculable,” said Dennis Bisgaard, KO’s head of school.

“In addition to being a phenomenal teacher, [Pat] was a phenomenal artist,” Murphy said. Rosoff worked in seemingly every medium, Murphy said. “She was a painter, sculptor, quilter, printmaker, sketcher. She’d use every imaginable material – t-shirts, balloons, bits of yarn – in unimaginable ways, creating things of colorful and whimsical beauty.”

Rosoff was an art critic for the Hartford Advocate from 1994 to 2007 and had essays published in Arts Magazine, Art New England and Sculpture magazine, according to her author’s biography on the Tupelo Press website. Rosoff’s book, “Innocent Eye: A Passionate Look at Contemporary Art,” was published in 2013.

News of Rosoff’s death spread quickly among faculty and staff at Kingswood Oxford, but school officials waited until later in the day to make the announcement to students. Tuesday was the first day back after a two-week spring break, Murphy said. During that break, Rosoff had traveled to California to visit her son, a KO graduate, and her grandson.

“Pat was an artist in every sense of the word – an artist of color, words, people, and emotions,” said Natalie Demers, KO’s assistant head of school for academic life. “And, she was the ultimate student – she never wanted to stop learning new things. She truly epitomized lifelong learning. She is who anyone in education would aspire to be: She saw the good, and the potential, in everyone. We will miss her terribly.”

“She was so fun,” said junior Olivia Whirty, who was in a painting class taught by Rosoff last year. “She was always the one to laugh at assemblies. She was quirky.”

Rosoff lived in West Hartford and grew up Turlock, Calif. She was an abstract painter and received her bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the Rhode Island School of Design and a master’s degree from Hartford Art School.

Although she’d been at KO four decades, “she had a sparkle in her eye and a joy for living that made her seem far younger and helped her identify with students,” Murphy said. “She just loved teaching.”

Rosoff is survived by her husband, Neil, their son Jared, daughter-in-law, Betsy, and their grandson Arlo, 2½.

“Our hearts are broken for her husband and her son, and her grandson,” Murphy said.

Courant staff writer Julie Stagis contributed to this story.

ONE lane is blocked on the A34 northbound following a five-car traffic collision.

Breaking news Delays on A34 after five vehicle collision near Abingdon

By Rachel Bayne

Delays on A34 after five vehicle collision near Abingdon

ONE lane is blocked on the A34 northbound following a five-car traffic collision.

Drivers are facing delays near Abingdon between the A415 Marcham Road and A4183 Oxford Road, although police have confirmed that no one was injured.

The accident occurred just before the Abingdon North turn-off.

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10:37am Tue 25 Mar 14

Derbyshire Traveller

says…

Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an
d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!

Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an
d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!
Derbyshire Traveller

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11:22am Tue 25 Mar 14

TobyB1960

says…

Derbyshire Traveller wrote:
Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an

d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!

Nice summary of the issues Derbyshire Traveller. Being previously involved with Oxfordshire Highways, I do know the county is too reliant on a few key roads for moving people and freight through the county. Sometime ago we did investigate upgrading the A34 to 3 lanes, north and south between the M4 and the M40, but came to the conclusion that it would only be another 10 years before the road was congested again. The A34 is not a problem that the county highways can resolve itself; it needs strategic planning from the government about how we can move people and freight between the midlands and the south coast. Building more roads isn’t the answer on its own but a new north/south rail line would give a substantial new transport capacity.

[quote][p][bold]Derbyshire Traveller[/bold] wrote:
Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an

d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives![/p][/quote]Nice summary of the issues Derbyshire Traveller. Being previously involved with Oxfordshire Highways, I do know the county is too reliant on a few key roads for moving people and freight through the county. Sometime ago we did investigate upgrading the A34 to 3 lanes, north and south between the M4 and the M40, but came to the conclusion that it would only be another 10 years before the road was congested again. The A34 is not a problem that the county highways can resolve itself; it needs strategic planning from the government about how we can move people and freight between the midlands and the south coast. Building more roads isn’t the answer on its own but a new north/south rail line would give a substantial new transport capacity.
TobyB1960

  • Score: 5
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Ramirez gets seven months in fatal Oxford crash

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Monday, March 24, 2014 10:50 PM EDT

Ramirez gets seven months in fatal Oxford crash
Friend killed when car struck building


Eric H. Ramirez, far left, 21 of Oxford, walks out of Derby Superior Court in this archive photo. He was sentenced Monday to seven months in prison. RA Archive


OXFORD — An Oxford man who killed his teenage friend in a car accident while fleeing from police two years ago was sentenced Monday to seven months in prison.

Superior Court Judge Charles T. Lee handed down the sentence to 21-year-old Eric Ramirez at Derby Superior Court despite pleas for no jail time from the mother of victim Brandon Giordano.

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Ramirez gets seven months in fatal Oxford crash Friend killed when car struck …

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Monday, March 24, 2014 10:50 PM EDT

Ramirez gets seven months in fatal Oxford crash
Friend killed when car struck building


Eric H. Ramirez, far left, 21 of Oxford, walks out of Derby Superior Court in this archive photo. He was sentenced Monday to seven months in prison. RA Archive


OXFORD — An Oxford man who killed his teenage friend in a car accident while fleeing from police two years ago was sentenced Monday to seven months in prison.

Superior Court Judge Charles T. Lee handed down the sentence to 21-year-old Eric Ramirez at Derby Superior Court despite pleas for no jail time from the mother of victim Brandon Giordano.

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Post a reader comment

We encourage your feedback and dialog.
Please be civil and respectful.
If you’re witty, to the point and quotable, your reader comments may also be included on the Around the Towns page of The Sunday Republican.
Registered users comments will be posted automatically.
All other comments will be reviewed by our staff before appearing on the Web site.
Click Here to register.

   

Man Gets 7 Months For Crash That Killed Oxford Teen

Retribution and deterrence.

Derby Superior Court Judge Charles T. Lee cited those two concepts Monday in sentencing an Oxford man who was behind the wheel in a crash that killed 15-year-old Brandon Giordano in March 2012 to seven months behind bars, despite pleas from the departed teen’s mother to spare the man prison time.

The judge said that though the man, 21-year-old Eric Ramirez, is clearly remorseful, and Giordano’s family showed “remarkable decency” in forgiving him, Ramirez “also owes a debt to society.”

Background

Ramirez was driving Giordano and another friend, 16-year-old Dion Major, to Oxford late on the night of March 9, 2012 in his 2000 Ford Mustang when he failed to pull over for a Seymour police officer who tried to stop him on Route 67 for having illegal “ground effect” lights on his car.

Ramirez sped up Route 67 into Oxford, at one point going 91 mph in a 30 mph zone, and also turned off his car’s lights in an effort to elude the pursuing police officer.

He eventually lost control of his car while trying to turn onto Old State Road 67, then hit a grassy embankment that caused the vehicle to vault nearly 60 feet through the air before hitting the side of the Precision Glass and Mirror building.

The car came to rest on its roof.

Giordano, riding in the back seat, was pronounced dead at the scene, and Ramirez and Major were hospitalized for their injuries.

Click here for a previous story.

Ramirez was arrested about six months after the crash, and in January pleaded no contest to charges of negligent homicide with a motor vehicle and engaging police in pursuit.

The plea offer from Judge Lee in the case called for a maximum sentence of nine months behind bars.

Giordano’s mother, Angela Borrelli, has for months said she’d prefer to see Ramirez receive probation and be ordered to talk to other teens about the consequences of his actions that night two years ago.

’They See It As A Game’

But prosecutor John Kerwin asked Judge Lee to hand down the nine-month jail sentence, saying that while Borrelli’s attitude was brave and commendable, the judge also had to keep in mind the importance of deterring others from behaving similarly.

“This is a very serious crime,” Kerwin siad. “A young man’s life was cut short . . . The community needs to feel as if there’s been justice. The only reasonable punishment is a sentence of jail.”

Kerwin said that he’s seen all too many cases of teens involved in fatal motor vehicle accidents in his two decades as a prosecutor.

He cited a “teenage culture” that glorifies speed and trying to run from cops, pointing to video games like “Need For Speed” and movies like the “Fast and the Furious” franchise that, he argued, teach teens it’s OK to run from police.

When you crash a car in a game, it’s easy to just hit the reset button, he said.

“They see it as a game,” Kerwin told Judge Lee. “That doesn’t happen in real life.”

Mother: ‘It Was An Impulsive, Stupid Decision’

In a tearful statement, Borrelli disagreed with Kerwin, saying she didn’t think he was trying to play a game with the cop pursuing him.

“He had no time to think,” Borrelli said. “It was an impulsive, stupid decision.”

If the judge wanted to send a message in the case, Borrelli said, sending Ramirez to jail wouldn’t be the best one.

“He should be out there talking to kids,” she said, instead of being forced to “harden himself” to survive in prison.

“He’s living forever, waking up every morning, knowing he’s part of the reason why Brandon’s not here today,” she said.

Borrelli read a sympathy card Ramirez gave her in the days after the crash saying he was “extremely sorry.”

“I loved him like the brother I never had,” she quoted Ramirez as writing.

“He’s learned his lesson,” Borrelli said. “Jail’s not going to teach him anything further than he’s already learned.”

’He Did Not Set Out To Hurt Anybody’

Ramirez’s lawyer, Tara Knight, said Ramirez feels “profoundly guilty” about the crash.

“This was an accident,” she said. “He did not set out to hurt anybody.”

Knight also said that deterrence “does not work with teenage boys” who lack impulse control and don’t always appreciate the consequences of their actions.

The remorse of those consequences are sufficient punishment, she argued.

“Isn’t ‘I killed my best friend,’ isn’t that enough?” Knight asked. “No one is beating himself up more than Eric . . . Nothing good comes of jail. Nothing.”

’I’ll Never Forgive Myself’

Ramirez echoed his lawyer’s remarks in a brief statement he made after his parents and an aunt asked Judge Lee not to send him to jail.

“Every day of my life I just wake up thinking that I cannot be with my friend anymore, my best friend,” Ramirez said. “We spent almost every day together.”

He said when he found out Brandon died, “I couldn’t cope with it. I just couldn’t believe it, knowing that the rest of my life I’d never be able to see him again.”

“I don’t know what made me go out of control like that,” Ramirez said. “I don’t remember it. I just wish that I could remember at least something of that day, just so I could remember my last day with him.”

“I thought of his family as my own family. I was always welcome in their house and they always made me feel loved even though I wasn’t their own son,” Ramirez went on, saying he couldn’t see how Borrelli could be so generous in her support.

“I just feel absolutely awful every day. I try to talk to Brandon . . . I go outside and look up to the sky and talk to him. It just really hurts me every day,” he said. “I’ll never forgive myself, no matter what happens.”

‘Eric Must Be Held Responsible’

Before handing down the sentence, Judge Lee discussed Ramirez’s background — and pointed out Ramirez had five prior motor vehicle violations on his record, including for driving unreasonably fast and having illegal lights on his car, which led to his having to take part in “operator retraining” classes twice.

The judge said he believed those prior violations “may have been partly what caused Mr. Ramirez to panic and speed away from the police cruiser, rather than pull over and face the consequences of another vehicle citation.”

Judge Lee said that though Ramirez’s “attitude toward the offense is plainly one of great remorse,” Ramirez also owed a debt to society.

The judge said he had to consider a number of factors in deciding on a sentence — deterrence of future similar conduct, protecting society from danger, rehabilitation, retribution.

“In this case the two most pertinent factors are retribution and deterrence,” Judge Lee said. “Brandon was killed as the result of Eric’s misconduct in fleeing from the police at high speed and then turning off his lights.”

“As a result, society was deprived of the benefit of a promising young man, who will not have a family, who will not serve his country,” the judge went on. “Eric must be held responsible and pay a price for choosing to act wrongly.”

At the same time, he said it’s important to deter others from acting similarly in the future.

“It does not take much elaboration to consider how bad the consequences could be if other young drivers were to see that engaging in this kind of behavior, which caused a death, was not met with meaningful punishment,” the judge said. “In light of these factors, incarceration is required.”

As Ramirez’s friends and family members cried in the first row of the courtroom’s gallery, the judge then sentenced him to an 18-month prison sentence, to be suspended after Ramirez serves seven months, to be followed by two years of probation.

While on probation, Judge Lee ordered Ramirez to perform 175 hours of community service by participating in a program run by Mothers Against Drunk Driving (though Ramirez was sober at the time of the crash) by speaking to other teens about the accident.

Reaction

Outside the courtroom, Knight said she was disappointed with the judge’s sentence, saying she thought it was “predetermined.”

“I do understand the reasons for the decision, but I think in light of the particular circumstances of this case, he should have gotten a more minimal jail sentence,” Knight said.

“It’s a tragedy all the way around,” she said.

Borrelli said that while she did not want Ramirez sent to jail, “I can’t say that I’m truly disappointed in the final decision.”

“I trusted that the judge would make the right decision,” Borrelli said. “I decided to put it in God’s hands whatever the outcome was. I’m not happy or sad. It is a relief that is finally over.”

She said she feels sorry for Ramirez’s family, but that “he will come home. Brandon doesn’t come home.”

Borrelli’s lawyer, Richard Lynch, said Giordano’s family is still considering filing a lawsuit against the Seymour police in connection with the chase.

The officer who tried to stop Ramirez, Anthony Renaldi, was cleared of wrongdoing in the pursuit by an internal investigation, though Knight called the internal probe a “whitewash” that glossed over the fact that Renaldi’s alleged termination of the pursuit was never recorded by the police department’s dispatch center.

“That’s being investigated,” Lynch said of a possible lawsuit. “Our law office is gathering information and pursuing every avenue but have not made a decision at this point.”

Ramirez’s family members declined to comment outside the courthouse.

Oxford man gets 7 months in crash that killed teen



DERBY Oxford resident Eric Ramirez was sentenced Monday to 18 months in jail, suspended after seven for the motor vehicle death two years ago of Brandon Giordano, 15, of Oxford.

“I’ll never forgive myself. No matter what happens, it’ll never be enough,” Ramirez, 21, told Superior Court Judge Charles T. Lee.

Ramirez in January pleaded no contest before Lee to charges of negligent homicide and engaging police in pursuit, both misdemeanors, for the March 9, 2012, crash.

Police had pursued Ramirez before the accident. His Ford Mustang convertible hit a commercial building and was found upside-down on Old State Road in Oxford.

Ramirez was seriously hurt; front-seat passenger Dion Major, then 16, was treated at the hospital for minor injuries and released; Brandon, an Oxford High School sophomore, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Ramirez’s attorney, Tara Knight, of Knight Cerritelli in New Haven, has said her client “suffers daily with the feeling of guilt and loss of his friend, Brandon.”

Although Ramirez didn’t want to go to jail, he accepted that as a possibility, Knight has said.

Brandon’s mother, Angela Borrelli, has said she does not want Ramirez to be incarcerated.

Knight has said the Seymour Police Department “bears a huge responsibility for the loss of life.”

“The decision to pursue a teenager for illegal lighting (on his car) was irresponsible,” Knight has said.

Seymour police Officer Anthony Renaldi, who pursued Ramirez on Route 67 from Seymour into Oxford before the accident, was cleared of wrongdoing and was not disciplined.

After a six-month probe, the state police Collision Analysis and Reconstruction Squad concluded the car hit the building as Ramirez tried to evade Renaldi. Ramirez was charged on a warrant by state police at Troop A in Southbury.

Renaldi saw LED lights flashing from underneath Ramirez’ 2000 Ford Mustang. When Renaldi tried to stop the car in Seymour, Ramirez sped up. Renaldi pursued the car on Route 67. He turned off his siren and flashing lights and continued into Oxford.

State police said Ramirez failed to negotiate the curve onto Old State Road. As a result, the car went airborne and hit a commercial building at 43 Old State Road before coming to rest upside down.

Brandon’s family has a civil claim against the Seymour Police Department in connection with his death, Knight said.

A week after Brandon’s death, about 300 people attended his two-hour funeral, including dozens of members of the Wolverines football team, for which he wore No. 69 as a lineman.

His 55 jersey-clad teammates, carrying or wearing flowers, escorted his family and casket in a 15-minute procession into the Oxford church.

Many boys in the church wore pink ties, because Brandon always wore something pink, one teen said.

Family, friends and his coach told of a boy who was hard-working, dedicated, loving, witty and loads of fun.

Attendees included Brandon’s grandmother, Deb Borrelli, grandfather, Jerry Borrelli, First Selectman George R. Temple, then-Derby Mayor Anthony Staffieri and several teachers.

Reporters Jean Falbo-Sosnovich and Patricia Villers contributed to this story. Call Phyllis Swebilius at 203-789-5681. Have questions, feedback or ideas about our coverage? Connect directly with the editors of the New Haven Register at AskTheRegister.com.

Man dies in road crash in Thame

Breaking news Man dies in road crash in Thame

By Rachel Bayne

Man dies in road crash in Thame

A MAN died after he drove his car off the Moreton Road in Thame.

The 69 year-old from Aylesbury died at the scene near the junction of the A329 Rycote Lane after driving his grey Renault Laguna estate car off the road.

Thames Valley Police only released details of the fatality today when they made an appeal for witnesses. The force would not give details about the death on Saturday.

Police were called to the scene at 11.39am.

The vehicle had been driving north along Moreton Road away from the Moreton Village before the accident.

One car was involved in the incident and no other injuries were reported.

The road was closed in both directions for two hours between the junction with Oxford Road and the A40 London Road.

Anyone with information can call PC Sarah Davies at Abingdon police station on 101.

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Girl dies after accident with reversing car

Girl dies after accident with reversing car

Oaks View Park

A TWO-year-old girl has died after an accident involving a reversing car.

The child – named locally as Elly-May Doran – died hours after the incident at Oaks View Park in Upper Arncott, about four miles south of Bicester.

She was involved in the collision at the caravan park at 4.55pm on Saturday.

The girl was initially taken to Bicester Community Hospital before then being sent on to John Radcliffe Hospital.

She was declared dead shortly after her arrival.

Information about the incident was not released by Thames Valley Police until Sunday afternoon.

The site is home to several traveller families, although yesterday the girl’s parents were not at home.

People in the tight-knit community expressed shock about the incident, and said the girl was known as China Doll to friends and family.

She was well-known by the other residents on the park, with one person who wished to remain anonymous describing her as “a little angel”.

Arncott parish councillor Lee Savidge said: “It’s pretty shocking, and very sad for everyone involved.

“I don’t know anyone up on the campsite personally. They keep themselves to themselves.”
A police spokesman said: “At about 4.55pm, a two-year-old girl was in collision with a reversing car on Oaks View Park.”
Investigator Stuart Whitworth said: “This is a tragic incident.
“I ask anyone with any information on the collision to give us a call immediately.”
A 49-year-old man from Upper Arncott has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by careless driving.
He was released on bail until March 31.

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Girl dies after accident with reversing car

Girl dies after accident with reversing car

Oaks View Park

A TWO-year-old girl has died after an accident involving a reversing car.

The child – named locally as Elly-May Doran – died hours after the incident at Oaks View Park in Upper Arncott, about four miles south of Bicester.

She was involved in the collision at the caravan park at 4.55pm on Saturday.

The girl was initially taken to Bicester Community Hospital before then being sent on to John Radcliffe Hospital.

She was declared dead shortly after her arrival.

Information about the incident was not released by Thames Valley Police until Sunday afternoon.

The site is home to several traveller families, although yesterday the girl’s parents were not at home.

People in the tight-knit community expressed shock about the incident, and said the girl was known as China Doll to friends and family.

She was well-known by the other residents on the park, with one person who wished to remain anonymous describing her as “a little angel”.

Arncott parish councillor Lee Savidge said: “It’s pretty shocking, and very sad for everyone involved.

“I don’t know anyone up on the campsite personally. They keep themselves to themselves.”
A police spokesman said: “At about 4.55pm, a two-year-old girl was in collision with a reversing car on Oaks View Park.”
Investigator Stuart Whitworth said: “This is a tragic incident.
“I ask anyone with any information on the collision to give us a call immediately.”
A 49-year-old man from Upper Arncott has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by careless driving.
He was released on bail until March 31.

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