Lawsuit filed in I-275 crash that killed teen

A lawsuit was filed in the nasty wreck on I-275 that killed a 16-year-old boy.

The mother of Damien Henderson filed suit against driver Larry Molloy.

Henderson was with other teenagers in Molloy’s SUV a few weeks ago when Molloy lost control and crashed in Anderson Township near Kellogg Avenue.

Henderson was tossed from the car and later died.

The lawsuit is seeking financial damages for future lost wages and mental anguish, among other things.

Police said that speed and alcohol were factors in the accident.

Congestion on southbound I-95 near Glades Road, continues into Broward County

Update: If you’re headed out of Palm Beach County on southbound I-95 expect plenty of traffic congestion beginning at Glades Road and going through Hillsboro Boulevard, though there does not seem to be any road blockage.

Original Post: The roads are slick, and a couple of crashes are reported on Interstate 95 and Florida’s Turnpike.

FHP reports:

I95 SB at Glades. Crash. Right lane blocked.

Turnpike SB south of Glades Rd. Crash. No block.

Turnpike SB north of Fort Pierce at mm 165.5. Crash.

Flagler Drive remains closed in West Palm Beach after the weekend’s boat show. But southbound lanes from Banyan to Okeechobee are expected to reopen at 5 p.m. Friday at 5 p.m., both northbound and southbound lanes will be open.

1 person killed in Florosa car accident

FLOROSA — At least one person died early Tuesday morning on U.S. Highway 98 near the intersection with Rue Dianne in the Florosa area.

According to Florosa Volunteer Fire Department, they responded before 5 a.m. to a single-vehicle accident. A car had apparently hit a soft spot, over-corrected and possibly flipped, they said.

Two were transported, according to the department.

However, by 9 a.m. the Florida Highway Patrol, which is investigating the accident, listed it as a fatal accident on their website.

The car was on the shoulder of the eastbound lanes, partially in a ditch, according to the department.

The accident happened just as traffic was starting to build for the morning commute.

Route 301 crash victim no longer in hospital – Chronicle

Emily Williams, 20, of Wellington, was released Friday from Metro Health Medical Center in Cleveland, a nursing supervisor said Monday. Williams was critically injured in a two-vehicle crash on U.S. Route 20, east of state Route 301, on Feb. 25.

Police said Williams lost control of the car she was driving and crossed the median during icy and snowy conditions. The driver of the other car wasn’t seriously injured.

Teen driving safety class on Long Island

Originally published: March 24, 2014 1:53 PM
Updated: March 25, 2014 8:57 AM

By Beth Whitehouse
 beth.whitehouse@newsday.com

Drive Square, a Virginia-based company, uses a simulator

Drive Square, a Virginia-based company, uses a simulator to show kids what it’s like to drive while texting or drunk. The company is participating in a workshop for teens and their parents at the West Islip Fire Department on Saturday, March 29, 2014. (Credit: Drive Square)

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Monique Cobb is used to teenagers screaming when they’re driving her car. That’s because they’ve just hit a pedestrian, or a child on a bicycle, or gotten into a crash.

“They’re, like, ‘Oh my gosh!’” Cobb says. “I think we put the fear of God in them.”

Cobb is operations director for Drive Square, an Alexandria, Va.-based company that takes a simulator to gatherings of teenagers to show them what can happen if they drive while texting or after drinking.


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Each student sits behind the wheel of an actual car and dons a headset that puts him on a virtual road. Then, he “drives.” The car doesn’t move, but sensors on the gas pedal, brake and steering wheel cause the car in the driver’s virtual vision to respond to his actions — or inactions.

To simulate drinking and driving, the simulator delays the response time when the student hits the brake to mirror the delayed reflexes of a drunk person. To simulate texting and driving, the driver must answer a text while driving the simulator. “We have found it to be very effective,” Cobb says.

Drive Square is one of the participants in a Keeping Teens Safe on the Roads program Saturday for teens ages 15 to 18 and their parents. The program is being offered by Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, in partnership with the Aram R. Chowdhury Memorial Foundation, and it will be held at the West Islip Fire Department. It’s free, but preregistration is required.

FREE LUNCH AND RAFFLE

Participants will receive a complimentary lunch, and each student attending will be entered in a raffle to win a $1,000 college scholarship from the Chowdhury Foundation, which Ellen Chowdhury and her family established to help educate teens about risky driving behaviors.

Aram Chowdhury, who graduated from Half Hollow Hills High School East in Dix Hills in 1994, was home for his first Thanksgiving break from the University of Vermont when he went for a ride with a friend whose parents had just given him a sports car. “An 18-year-old, what does he want to do? He wants to show off. He was speeding on a local road,” Ellen Chowdhury says of the driver. Aram was in a coma for nearly two weeks before he died. “I had to do something to make my son’s death have some meaning. The heartache is always there.”

SHARING HIS STORY

Saturday’s event will include a testimonial from accident survivor Chris Memoli, who suffered traumatic brain injury after his junior year at Sachem High School, when he was a passenger in a car that was racing with another car and veered out of control. He is unable to speak; he communicates through a voice activation machine.

“Without my speech it may take a minute or so to answer some of the questions, so they get to see what we all take for granted and what I struggle with,” Memoli explains on his website, chrismemoli.com.

RULES OF THE ROAD

Other scheduled activities include nurse Maureen Sheridan, director of trauma services at Good Samaritan, describing car accident injuries that she sees in teens coming through the emergency room. And retired Suffolk County Police Officer Paul Failla, a 27-year veteran of the department, will give a lesson on driving laws.

“My goal is to get people to realize the importance of safe driving and adhering to the rules in order to avoid a possible tragedy,” Failla says. Failla has been working with Chowdhury for years on the mission of protecting kids.

Chowdhury is a nurse at Good Samaritan; her husband, Faizur Chowdhury, is an endocrinologist affiliated with the hospital, and Aram was born there. That’s why the couple wanted to partner with Good Samaritan for the driving seminar.

As for Good Samaritan, educating teens about safety is part of its mission as a community health resource, says Theresa Jacobellis, the hospital’s assistant vice president of public affairs and marketing. “We are a trauma center, so we do see a high number of these injuries in teens. It’s something we wanted to address.”

WHAT Keeping Teens Safe on the Roads, for those 15 to 18 and their parents

WHEN | WHERE 10 a.m. check-in and 10:30 a.m. to 2p.m. program Saturday at the West Islip Fire Department, 309 Union Blvd.

INFO Free, but preregistration required; includes complimentary lunch; 631-376-4444, goodsamaritan.chsli.org

4 injured when car crashes into Connecticut store

National News

4 injured when car crashes into Connecticut store
March 25, 2014 12:18 GMT

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut authorities say an out-of-control car exiting Interstate 95 in Fairfield crashed into a convenience store, injuring four people and damaging the building and five other vehicles.

Fairfield police say the car was going too fast on the southbound exit 24 off-ramp Monday night. It plowed into several other vehicles and a Cumberland Farms store and gas station at the bottom of the ramp.

Police say a woman driving the out-of-control car and three other people were taken to a hospital. Authorities say their injuries don’t appear to be life-threatening. The name of the woman hasn’t been released.

Authorities say there is moderate damage to the store, but the gas pumps weren’t damaged.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Ex-Navy QB Rafi Montalvo plans to visit injured Midshipmen slotback

A former Navy football player whose career was ended prematurely after he sustained a brain injury in a car accident said Monday night that he plans to come to Baltimore next week to comfort a former teammate who is now in a coma after brain surgery Saturday.

Freshman slotback Will McKamey collapsed during a noncontact practice in Annapolis and was flown by medical helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery to relieve a blood clot on his brain.

McKamey, who is from Knoxville, Tenn., has shown “little response” since then, according to his parents.

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“I want them to be positive. My family was pretty negative when I had my accident,” Rafi Montalvo said in an interview Monday night. “Everybody was down. It was pretty bad. I want to be able to go up there and say these things to them, so they can have motivation that he will get there, and he will be fine.”

Montalvo, who was a promising freshman quarterback when he was critically injured Thanksgiving night in 2012 near his home in Miami, left the academy in January after not being able to continue playing football. He is currently trying to become a competitive college rower.

Montalvo said that he has written a “three-page letter” that he hoped to send McKamey and his parents to offer his support and detail what he did during a lengthy recovery and rehabilitation process that eventually led to his return to the academy last summer.

“I know his family supported me through my ordeal,” Montalvo said. “I wanted to go up there and help. You have to keep faith and keep positive and everything’s going to be OK. I know my family was devastated and went through very hard times [when he was injured].”

Montalvo, then 19 years old, sustained serious head injuries when he was a passenger in a car that drove into a house “at 70 miles an hour” on a dark and foggy street in Miami.

“Obviously, the doctors were wrong about what they thought I was going to be, and the end result,” Montalvo said. “They told my parents there was a 95 percent chance I was going to be a vegetable.”

Montalvo said that he was aware of the fact that McKamey had sustained a brain injury during a high school playoff game a few weeks before his own car accident. After McKamey came to the academy last summer and Montalvo returned, the two discussed their respective brain injuries.

McKamey became something of an inspiration for Montalvo in his own comeback.

“There were two different situations. Mine was a car accident and his was from football, but my brain was bleeding like his brain. I saw him coming back and getting cleared and playing football,” Montalvo recalled. “All throughout fall, he was fine. I thought I should be able to play, too.”

McKamey’s parents said in a statement released by the Navy athletic department that their 19-year-old son had collapsed during a light workout Saturday. They also said that he had been cleared to play by doctors in Tennessee after undergoing “4-6″ CAT scans and MRIs following the first brain injury. McKamey did not have surgery that time.

Montalvo’s Navy football career ended when doctors at the academy refused to clear him to return to the field despite the fact that he had passed a battery of cognitive tests. Montalvo then left the academy with hopes of playing elsewhere, but gave up his quest when doctors in Miami recommended that he not play again.

After hearing from his former teammates shortly after McKamey collapsed Saturday, he thought about their burgeoning friendship.

“I was just getting to know him, and we were becoming pretty [close] friends when I left,” Montalvo said. “He’s a really good kid. He was kind of like me. I’m kind of a quiet person, and he’s kind of the same way. He kind of reminded me of myself. He was a really hard worker.

“You need to have some good fortune with this injury. I remember when I came back, coach [Ken] Niumat[alolo] was saying that I was a miracle. I didn’t want to look at it like that. Hard work got me to where I’m at. All the work did, all the therapy I did.”

Montalvo said that his letter to McKamey and his family is about “just having faith, being positive, that everything’s going to come out OK. No matter how bad it is now, the end when he gets out of the hospital, you can fully recover with the rehab. I wanted to let them know how I recovered, and how Will needs to come back from this.”

Though he initially had hoped to play football again, Montalvo has stayed involved in the game by helping coach the quarterbacks at his former high school and has stayed active by throwing himself into a new sport — rowing — in which he hopes to compete on the club level at nearby Florida International.

“I felt like I really needed to do something to keep my mind busy again,” Montalvo said. “Football I really loved, and it kept me busy and working hard all the time. I feel rowing has been a huge part of my family as well [a younger brother will compete at Georgetown in the fall]. It took me six days to learn how to row. It usually takes people months.”

don.markus@baltsun.com

Aurora family wants justice for death of teen in car accident

AURORA, Colo. — An Aurora family is grieving — and demanding justice — after their 17-year-old was killed when his car was broadsided by a possible drunk driver.

There is a bill that could toughen up Colorado law in cases just like this.

The bill would make prison mandatory for drunk drivers who kill or injure people. It’s important to note, in this deadly crash, the second driver is still in the hospital and has not been charged yet.

And police only suspect that he was drunk.

There is a growing memorial at East Colfax Avenue and Dayton Street for the teenager’s family. They’re going through the pain of losing their son.

A few hours before 17-year-old Juan Palomino was hit and killed by a suspect drunk driver, he was with loved ones at a family dinner.

“He said bye aunt, I’m going with my friends you know and he leaves happy, you know,” said Maria Palomino, an aunt.

At the intersection of Colfax and Dayton, friends and family of the teenager find comfort in each other.

“To know that I lost my best friend last night, it breaks my heart,” Misael Longoria said.

“Not even a two-minute drive. He never made it home,” Nancy Sanchez said. “And we hope and expect that the law gets tougher on these people who kill innocent people.”

Police will continue to look at all evidence, including surveillance video showing the impact of the crash. Meanwhile, at the State Capitol, there’s an effort to change Colorado law in cases where a driver kills or seriously injures someone.

Right now, many offenders — more than a dozen in the past 10 years — are sentenced to probation.

“We cannot allow this to keep happening where people get drunk, they get behind the wheel of a car,” said Alma Sanchez, an aunt of the victim. “Basically a deadly weapon and they cause all of this sorrow and grief and our family’s never going to be the same.”

Police say the driver who allegedly ran the red light is still in the hospital and he won’t be charged until he’s released.

He’s facing several charges, including vehicular homicide and drunk driving.

ONE lane is blocked on the A34 northbound following a five-car traffic collision.

Breaking news Delays on A34 after five vehicle collision near Abingdon

By Rachel Bayne

Delays on A34 after five vehicle collision near Abingdon

ONE lane is blocked on the A34 northbound following a five-car traffic collision.

Drivers are facing delays near Abingdon between the A415 Marcham Road and A4183 Oxford Road, although police have confirmed that no one was injured.

The accident occurred just before the Abingdon North turn-off.

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Comments (2)

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10:37am Tue 25 Mar 14

Derbyshire Traveller

says…

Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an
d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!

Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an
d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!
Derbyshire Traveller

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11:22am Tue 25 Mar 14

TobyB1960

says…

Derbyshire Traveller wrote:
Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an

d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives!

Nice summary of the issues Derbyshire Traveller. Being previously involved with Oxfordshire Highways, I do know the county is too reliant on a few key roads for moving people and freight through the county. Sometime ago we did investigate upgrading the A34 to 3 lanes, north and south between the M4 and the M40, but came to the conclusion that it would only be another 10 years before the road was congested again. The A34 is not a problem that the county highways can resolve itself; it needs strategic planning from the government about how we can move people and freight between the midlands and the south coast. Building more roads isn’t the answer on its own but a new north/south rail line would give a substantial new transport capacity.

[quote][p][bold]Derbyshire Traveller[/bold] wrote:
Set in the context of transport improvements, the A34 has been a tremendous success. Like many others from the midlands, we used to endure an 8 hour journey for the 200 mile trip to the south coast for our annual holidays. Improved only a little by travelling at silly o’clock! The A34 now means that journey, on a good day, is around 4 hours drive time!

However, set against the misery for the many families that have lost loved ones and the resulting frustration and inconvenience for those caught up in the chaos, the road hardly deserves any plaudits!

Travelling in the UK has become a big gamble! Thankfully, essential journeys are now rare, but yesterday was one of those! Planning to get to my destination at a reasonable time, late morning, and allowing five hours for the 185 miles to Portsmouth, M1,A43,M40 and A34, an early start and a generous time allowance would make for an easy return trip during the day! No big rush, nice, easy driving. Oh how wrong could I be?

3 hours and I’d only just made it to the A34. No worries though! Traffic flowing OK, just the usual right hand lane delays caused by speeding drivers having to brake heavily for the lorry drivers doing the 3 mile overtake! So with a little patience and right foot control, keeping moving was not too much of an issue, and the average speed was up in the high 50s! Not quick but that came to an abrupt halt come near Newbury, with another overturned lorry closing both north and southbound carriageways!

Now I’ve noted a number of critical comments about the length of time to clear up these incidents, however, collision investigation is now a detailed and painstaking process. Far more thorough than that I had at my disposal investigating what we used to call RTAs years ago. No fragment of debris or mark in the road or anywhere else, goes unrecorded, photographed and surveyed now! All helps build an understanding of causation, demanded by coroners when a death is under investigation!….an

d then there’s the need to move potentially unsafe cargo and severely damaged vehicles, often without causing additional damage if further forensic examination is needed!

So while I am no less frustrated by delays than any other driver, I do appreciate there’s a job needs to be done!

It does seem that the A34 has a particularly poor safety record. On my rare journeys down that road, I’ve experienced roughly half being disrupted by incidents on the road requiring carriageway closures. So yesterday was not a surprise and not too many alternatives, as the M25 is never an attractive first choice!

The diversions around the A34 chaos yesterday were obviously suffering gridlock, so sitting it out meant the planned journey time was a extended by almost 3 hours. The return journey, A3/M25 and M1 was necessary, as it was clear the northbound chaos was going to take some hours to clear. But it was kind to me, and three hours drive time made for an easy journey!

So what’s to be done? I know there’ll be highway planners talking carriageway widening. Others will want road freight shifting to rail. But drivers, transport companies could do more! Most problems on the roads are due to excess speed and inattention. This requires education and enforcement. There has never been as much traffic on our roads, but policing that environment has become a residual issue for chief constables, more concerned with terrorism and domestic violence! The number of dedicated roads policing officers is at an all time low and the only time you really see officers in any numbers is when they’re closing roads or investigating the loss of another life!

Drivers could slow down, plan better, have much lower expectations of journey times. Yes your BMW can do 100mph with ease, but it’s rarely safe and always illegal! If you can maintain the speed limit on a motorway or main trunk road, you can think yourself lucky! Lorry drivers can help by not trying to overtake on gradients! A mobile road block with two LGV for a couple of miles…yes it does happen, it did yesterday too, at least a handful of times!….creates slowing and braking vehicles behind. The concertina effect will stop vehicles in the carriageway….and that results in accidents!

Time to police the road environment again! It’s cheaper than many hundreds of millions of extra lanes and better than lost lives![/p][/quote]Nice summary of the issues Derbyshire Traveller. Being previously involved with Oxfordshire Highways, I do know the county is too reliant on a few key roads for moving people and freight through the county. Sometime ago we did investigate upgrading the A34 to 3 lanes, north and south between the M4 and the M40, but came to the conclusion that it would only be another 10 years before the road was congested again. The A34 is not a problem that the county highways can resolve itself; it needs strategic planning from the government about how we can move people and freight between the midlands and the south coast. Building more roads isn’t the answer on its own but a new north/south rail line would give a substantial new transport capacity.
TobyB1960

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Joplin residents hurt in accident near Mount Vernon

March 25, 2014

Joplin residents hurt in accident near Mount Vernon




news@joplinglobe.com
The Joplin Globe


Tue Mar 25, 2014, 01:22 AM CDT

Two Joplin residents were injured in a two-vehicle accident at 4 p.m. Monday on Interstate 44 west of Mount Vernon, according to the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

The driver of one of the vehicles, Dominic S. Martello, 30, and his passenger, Dalton Link, 21, were taken by ambulance to Freeman Hospital West in Joplin, the state patrol said.

Their eastbound car was in the passing lane when Martello lost control of the vehicle and it crossed the centerline and struck an eastbound tractor-trailer driven by Jose D. Marquez, 38, of Oak Lawn, Ill., the patrol said.

• A resident of Gravette, Ark., was injured in a motorcycle accident at 8:01 a.m. Sunday on Oklahoma Highway 25, about four miles east of Grove in Delaware County, according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol.

Eric Wolfe, 48, was taken to Freeman Hospital West in Joplin, the patrol said.

The patrol said Wolfe applied the brakes of his eastbound motorcycle, and it overturned onto its side and slid to a stop.







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