New Years Day crash kills teen in Jupiter

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Jupiter teen killed in early morning crash on New Year’s Day

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‘Spectacular’ Crash on Jupiter Moon Europa May Have Delivered Life’s Building …

‘Spectacular’ Crash on Jupiter Moon Europa May Have Delivered Life’s Building Blocks

A new look at data from a NASA spacecraft has revealed evidence a colossal impact on Jupiter’s moon Europa, a collision that may have delivered key minerals and perhaps even the raw ingredients for life, scientists say.
The cosmic crash scene, which NASA billed a “spectacular collision with an asteroid or comet,” is the first time clay-like minerals have ever been detected on Europa. The discovery is based on a new analysis of images from NASA’s Galileo mission to Jupiter and is intriguing to scientists because comets and asteroids are often carriers of organic compounds, which can serve as ingredients for primitive life.
“Organic materials, which are important building blocks for life, are often found in comets and primitive asteroids,” Jim Shirley, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement today (Dec. 11). “Finding the rocky residues of this comet crash on Europa’s surface may open up a new chapter in the story of the search for life on Europa.” [Photos: Europa, Mysterious Icy Moon of Jupiter]
Scientists have held that Europa — one of more than 60 moons that circle Jupiter — may be one of the best places to look for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. Beneath its icy outer crust, the moon is thought to be hiding a saltwater ocean. Scientists have suspected that Europa is also home to organic materials, the carbon-based materials that make up the building blocks of life like proteins and DNA.
The new research supports the theory that comet or asteroid impacts could have delivered organic material to Europa. (Other research has suggested that space rocks also brought these seeds of life to Earth.)
Shirley and colleagues made the discovery while looking at 15-year-old near-infrared images from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which arrived at Jupiter in 1995 and circled the gas giant for eight years.
By today’s standards, the resolution of the photos is quite low. But with new noise-eliminating techniques, Shirley and colleagues report they were able to see a broken ring of minerals called phyllosilicates about 25 miles (40 kilometers) wide in the landscape of Europa. (Phyllosilicates are clay-like minerals that form in the presence of water.)
The researchers say it is unlikely that these phyllosilicates on the surface came from Europa’s interior; the moon’s thick outer shell, up to 60 miles (100 kilometers) thick in some areas, would present a formidable obstacle. Instead, this broken ring may represent the splash-back of ejected materials scattered over Europa when a space rock hit the moon’s surface from a shallow angle, the scientists say.
The phyllosilicate formation was located about 75 miles (120 km) away from the center of a 20-mile-diameter (30 km) crater site, the researchers say. Based on the size of this crater, the researchers think it may have been carved out by a 3,600-foot-wide (1,100 meters) asteroid, or perhaps a 5,600-foot-wide (1,700 meters) comet (similar in size to the recently deceased Comet ISON).
Another JPL scientist, Bob Pappalardo, who is working on a proposed mission to Europa, said researchers will need future missions to the moon to understand the specifics of Europa’s chemistry and what it might mean for the possibility of life.
“Understanding Europa’s composition is key to deciphering its history and its potential habitability,” Pappalardo said in a statement.
The research, which was funded by a NASA Outer Planets Research grant, will be presented on Friday (Dec. 13) at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

By SPACE.com , 5 hours 58 minutes ago 

Huge crash on Jupiter’s Europa may have delivered life’s building blocks

Dec. 11, 2013 at 6:59 PM ET

Europa

A new look at data from a NASA spacecraft has revealed evidence of a colossal impact on Jupiter’s moon Europa, a collision that may have delivered key minerals and perhaps even the raw ingredients for life, scientists say.

The cosmic crash scene, which NASA billed a “spectacular collision with an asteroid or comet,” is the first time claylike minerals have ever been detected on Europa. The discovery is based on a new analysis of images from NASA’s Galileo mission to Jupiter and is intriguing to scientists because comets and asteroids are often carriers of organic compounds, which can serve as ingredients for primitive life.

“Organic materials, which are important building blocks for life, are often found in comets and primitive asteroids,” Jim Shirley, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement Wednesday. “Finding the rocky residues of this comet crash on Europa’s surface may open up a new chapter in the story of the search for life on Europa.” [Photos: Europa, Mysterious Icy Moon of Jupiter]

Scientists have held that Europa — one of more than 60 moons that circle Jupiter — may be one of the best places to look for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. Beneath its icy outer crust, the moon is thought to be hiding a saltwater ocean. Scientists have suspected that Europa is also home to organic materials, the carbon-based materials that make up the building blocks of life like proteins and DNA.

The new research supports the theory that comet or asteroid impacts could have delivered organic material to Europa. (Other research has suggested that space rocks also brought these seeds of life to Earth.)

Europa1

Shirley and colleagues made the discovery while looking at 15-year-old near-infrared images from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which arrived at Jupiter in 1995 and circled the gas giant for eight years.

By today’s standards, the resolution of the photos is quite low. But with new noise-eliminating techniques, Shirley and colleagues report they were able to see a broken ring of minerals called phyllosilicates about 25 miles (40 kilometers) wide in the landscape of Europa. (Phyllosilicates are claylike minerals that form in the presence of water.)

The researchers say it is unlikely that these phyllosilicates on the surface came from Europa’s interior; the moon’s thick outer shell, up to 60 miles (100 kilometers) thick in some areas, would present a formidable obstacle. Instead, this broken ring may represent the splash-back of ejected materials scattered over Europa when a space rock hit the moon’s surface from a shallow angle, the scientists say.

The phyllosilicate formation was located about 75 miles (120 km) away from the center of a 20-mile-diameter (30 km) crater site, the researchers say. Based on the size of this crater, the researchers think it may have been carved out by a 3,600-foot-wide (1,100 meters) asteroid, or perhaps a 5,600-foot-wide (1,700 meters) comet (similar in size to the recently deceased Comet ISON).

Another JPL scientist, Bob Pappalardo, who is working on a proposed mission to Europa, said researchers will need future missions to the moon to understand the specifics of Europa’s chemistry and what it might mean for the possibility of life.

“Understanding Europa’s composition is key to deciphering its history and its potential habitability,” Pappalardo said in a statement.

The research, which was funded by a NASA Outer Planets Research grant, will be presented on Friday at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Follow Megan Gannon on Twitter and Google+. Follow us @SPACEdotcom, Facebook  or  Google+. Originally published on Space.com.

Copyright 2013 Space.com, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

‘Spectacular’ Crash On Jupiter Moon Europa May Have Delivered Life’s Building …

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‘Spectacular’ Crash On Jupiter Moon Europa May Have Delivered Life’s Building …


This artist’s concept shows a possible explosion resulting from a high-speed collision between a space rock and Jupiter’s moon Europa.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A new look at data from a NASA spacecraft has revealed evidence a colossal impact on Jupiter’s moon Europa, a collision that may have delivered key minerals and perhaps even the raw ingredients for life, scientists say.

The cosmic crash scene, which NASA billed a “spectacular collision with an asteroid or comet,” is the first time clay-like minerals have ever been detected on Europa. The discovery is based on a new analysis of images from NASA’s Galileo mission to Jupiter and is intriguing to scientists because comets and asteroids are often carriers of organic compounds, which can serve as ingredients for primitive life.

“Organic materials, which are important building blocks for life, are often found in comets and primitive asteroids,” Jim Shirley, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., said in a statement today (Dec. 11). “Finding the rocky residues of this comet crash on Europa’s surface may open up a new chapter in the story of the search for life on Europa.” [Photos: Europa, Mysterious Icy Moon of Jupiter]

Scientists have held that Europa — one of more than 60 moons that circle Jupiter — may be one of the best places to look for extraterrestrial life in our solar system. Beneath its icy outer crust, the moon is thought to be hiding a saltwater ocean. Scientists have suspected that Europa is also home to organic materials, the carbon-based materials that make up the building blocks of life like proteins and DNA.

The new research supports the theory that comet or asteroid impacts could have delivered organic material to Europa. (Other research has suggested that space rocks also brought these seeds of life to Earth.)

Shirley and colleagues made the discovery while looking at 15-year-old near-infrared images from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which arrived at Jupiter in 1995 and circled the gas giant for eight years.

This image, using data from NASA's Galileo mission, shows the first detection of clay-like minerals on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa.

By today’s standards, the resolution of the photos is quite low. But with new noise-eliminating techniques, Shirley and colleagues report they were able to see a broken ring of minerals called phyllosilicates about 25 miles (40 kilometers) wide in the landscape of Europa. (Phyllosilicates are clay-like minerals that form in the presence of water.)

The researchers say it is unlikely that these phyllosilicates on the surface came from Europa’s interior; the moon’s thick outer shell, up to 60 miles (100 kilometers) thick in some areas, would present a formidable obstacle. Instead, this broken ring may represent the splash-back of ejected materials scattered over Europa when a space rock hit the moon’s surface from a shallow angle, the scientists say.

The phyllosilicate formation was located about 75 miles (120 km) away from the center of a 20-mile-diameter (30 km) crater site, the researchers say. Based on the size of this crater, the researchers think it may have been carved out by a 3,600-foot-wide (1,100 meters) asteroid, or perhaps a 5,600-foot-wide (1,700 meters) comet (similar in size to the recently deceased Comet ISON).

Another JPL scientist, Bob Pappalardo, who is working on a proposed mission to Europa, said researchers will need future missions to the moon to understand the specifics of Europa’s chemistry and what it might mean for the possibility of life.

“Understanding Europa’s composition is key to deciphering its history and its potential habitability,” Pappalardo said in a statement.

The research, which was funded by a NASA Outer Planets Research grant, will be presented on Friday (Dec. 13) at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Follow Megan Gannon on Twitter and Google+. Follow us @SPACEdotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on SPACE.com.

Driver hospitalized after car crashes into wall at Palm Beach International …

A man has been taken to Jupiter Medical Center after being injured in a crash this evening at the Palm Beach International Raceway west of Jupiter off Beeline Highway, a spokesman for Palm Beach County Fire Rescue said.

Emergency crews responded shortly after 7:35 p.m. to reports of a vehicle hitting the wall at the raceway’s drag strip. On arrival, they found one man with serious injuries, Capt. Albert Borroto said.

No other details were immediately available.

“Freaked out” Jupiter man accused of DUI, hit and run

A Jupiter man is accused of DUI and hit and run after an August crash that sent a man to the hospital.

Rodger Francis Jaskolka, 23, was found hiding in brush about 200 feet from the Aug. 21 accident scene and told a Jupiter police officer he ran away because he was “freaked out.”

According to a police report, witnesses watched as Jaskolka ran a red light at the intersection of State Road 706 and State Road 811 before he slammed into a vehicle driven by Juan Cisneros. Cisneros was transported to St. Mary’s Trauma Center with undisclosed injuries.

Following the accident, witnesses told police Jaskolka “made no attempt to check on the driver” before fleeing the crash scene on foot. A Jupiter police officer found Jaskolka hiding in brush. Jaskolka was treated by fire rescue and transported to Jupiter Medical Center.

At the hospital, police say Jaskolka admitted drinking beer in the evening but felt “OK to drive.” Jaskolka told police he fled because he was scared and confused.

During an interview at the hospital, the officer noticed the odor of alcohol that “became stronger” as Jaskolka spoke. Jaskolka agreed to provide a blood sample to police because his injuries made a breath sample impractical, according to the arrest report.

The blood analysis showed that Jaskolka had an alcohol level of .139, above the state’s legal limit of .08.

Jaskolka was booked into the Palm Beach County Jail on Monday and released under supervision on Tuesday afternoon.

Patriot Guard Rider killed in crash Saturday in Jupiter

JUPITER — What was supposed to be a moment of pride and patriotism turned into a time of grief.

An Honor Flight carrying dozens of local World War II veterans landed safely at Palm Beach International Airport Saturday night. But in a heartbreaking twist, a motorcyclist that was supposed to escort those veterans to and from the airport was killed in an early morning crash in Jupiter.

Holding back the tears, a number of Patriot Guard Riders try to stick to their mission to welcome dozens of south Florida World War II veterans back from a much-deserved, long-overdue trip to our nation’s capitol.

“No matter what happened, today is their day,” said Ride Capt. Alan Cole. “So if we have to bite our lip a little bit, that’s to be.”

That mission is made more difficult when one of their own, Jack ‘Angel’ Regan, was killed trying to get to event. “His road name was angel. And he lived up to that,” said Cole.

Regan, 58, never made it beyond the stretch of Interstate 95 in Jupiter. The Coral Springs man was on his way to Stuart to escort the veterans’ vehicles to PBIA. At approximately 3 a.m. Saturday, Regan’s bike collided with a vehicle driven Amanda McClure, 24, of Palm City.

As they saluted our nation’s heroes, the Patriot Guard Riders also gave silent tribute to their friend. “His family is grieving very much and they’re not alone,” said Cole.

At last check, McClure was in serious condition. Her two passengers sustained minor injuries.

Regan leaves behind a wife, Debbie, in Coral Springs who is said to be finalizing funeral arrangements for her husband.

Coral Springs motorcyclist killed in crash on I-95 in Jupiter – Sun

John Henry Regan, 58, of Coral Springs, is dead this morning after he was struck while riding his motorcycle on I-95 about 3 a.m.

Florida Highway Patrol officials say that Regan was driving a 1984 Harley Davidson motorcycle northbound on I-95 between Donald Ross Road and Indian Town Road when he was struck from behind by a 2010 Lexus ES 350 driven by Amanda McClure of Palm City.

Investigators at the scene say Regan was thrown from his motorcycle, eventually coming to rest in the center grass median. Regan, who was wearing a helmet, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police are still investigating the exact cause of the accident and whether or not alcohol was a contributing factor.

McClure and her passenger, Sydnee Reeder, both suffered minor injuries and were taken to Jupiter Medical Center for treatment.